21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

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John P John P
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21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

I am arranging a boating event on the Basingstoke canal under the banner of the Amateur Yacht Research Society and anyone who finds this website of interest would be very welcome to attend. (The same is true for any of the other AYRS meetings - they are not limited to just for AYRS members.)

Actually it was thinking about the HBBR that gave me the idea for this event.  HBBR events seem to have become limited to the 'Thames Raid' which Josephine and myself have completed two and a half times now. But in the early days of the HBBR I have heard that other events were held, so why have they stopped?  I suspect that one reason is that it is not easy to find a venue which combines a campsite and a stretch of water with launch slipway for small craft. (It would be far easier in France than in the UK).  I actually brought a book called 'Camping by the Waterside' by Stephen Neale to try to identify venues that could be suitable for future HBBR gatherings and the Basingstoke Canal Centre looked like a good option in the south east of the country, which, for whatever reason, seems to be the area where most HBBR people are located.  

The idea of this gathering is to offer a weekend of easy boating together with an opportunity to discuss projects, to go out for an evening meal and to help with a practical experiment. The venue is the Basingstoke Canal Centre, Mytchett Place Road, Mytchett, Surrey GU16 6DD   Email info@basingstoke-canal.co.uk   Phone 01252 370073.  The facilities at the BCC include a slipway suitable for launching light craft onto the Basingstoke canal, a cafe, a meeting room and a campsite.  The Basingstoke canal is a very pretty stretch of water but it is not really suitable for sailing since there are low bridges and overhanging trees. However, the same could be said of the annual HBBR Thames trip, it seems that most of the HBBR boats are capable of propulsion by means other than sail. And in any case you dont need to bring a boat to come to this meeting, the canal can be explored via the towpath and indeed when I lived in the South East this was one of my favourite places to go running.

We have booked a meeting room at the BCC for 16:00 on the Saturday afternoon so that people can give presentations on AYRS style yacht research topics but also boating holidays, boat building etc. -  please let me know if you have something to offer. (my contact details below).

We propose to invite donations in the region of £5.00 per head to cover the cost of the meeting room.   We would ask members who bring boats to use on the canal to pay individually for a canal licence, this can be done on-line or on the day at the BCC office - it's £3 per day for all unpowered boats unless you are a member of British Canoeing in which case it is free.  Those who wish to camp at the canal centre should book individually by phone with the BCC office.  The BCC office tells me that they currently have space available on the campsite but I would sugest contacting them as soon as you can if you intend to take this option.


An outline program, given reasonable weather:

Saturday 21st September

•    Arrive and campers put up tents and settle in. Boats launched and canal fees   paid.

•    12:30 Lunch in BCC cafe.

•    From 13:30 convoy along the canal and back (with a tea time canal side picnic stop if weather suits)

•    16:30 Meeting in BCC meeting room to discuss members projects (as Thorpe meetings)- room hire from 16:00 to 19:00.

•    19:30 table booked in local pub or restaurant.  (the Harvester at Frimley Green has been suggested)

Sunday 22nd September

•    09:30 - Breakfast in BCC cafe

•    10:30 - Hull drag measurements for those who are interested in trying that, or as an alternative activity a second convoy along the canal in the opposite direction to Saturday.

•    13:30 Lunch in BCC cafe

•    Pack up and go home (or continue with hull drag measurements, depending on how that is working out)..

 
I hope the mention of a hull drag experiment does not put off HBBR people - you dont have to get involved in this if it is of no interest. It is something that a few AYRS members tried on the Basingstoke canal a couple of years ago.  The idea is to tow small boats along the canal and plot the tow line force against speed so as to compare the drag of different hull shapes and also to compare measured drag with drag that can be predicted by theoretical methods such as the free to download 'Michelet' computer programme.  I have to say that our previous attempt at this gave inconclusive results. For one thing we found that the towline force readings varied widely even at a steady speed - difficulty of keeping the towed boat on a sufficiently straight course may have been the problem.  This time round I hope to have slightly better equipment available including a load cell and data logging software. Suggestions would be welcome as would loan of equipment. The conclusion of this experiment may be that it is not worth trying to compare the drag of hulls in this way, or that such comparison is best left to professionals with proper tow test tanks - if that is the case then it is still a useful thing to have found out so not a failure!  

I am including a picture to give an idea of what the Basingstoke Canal is like.  This was actually taken some miles to the west of the BCC but it does show the nature of the waterway - sea sickness should not be a problem.  The picture also shows Jospehine in the rowing boat I made a couple of years back - Josephine and I have just returned from three weeks in France rowing this boat on four different rivers, will try to get arround to including something about that here as well.

John

Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

John,

How wide is the slipway, does it have vehicular access and can one bury a trailer in the water?

Hull drag is interesting, although I know MilliBee has noticable drag and there is little I can do about it.

Moving the transom back ~1ft, making it less wide and increasing the waterline length by ~8% might create less wake/drag - but I won't have time to mock up an extension.

Collateral impact is the sailing centre of effort when heeled, which may upset sail balance.

Paul
John P John P
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Re: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

Hi Paul
It seems that the Basingstoke Canal Centre considers two groups of boats - Canoes, rowboats and paddleboards are one group and a one day licence for this group is £3.00 (or free for BCu members) and there dont appear to be any other payments or requirements.  The second group is 'trailer boats' which have to pay an additional lock fee but I have an idea from what someone said that having electric rather than internal combustion propulsion may make a difference.  I dont think their website is all that clear about the fees for 'trailer boats' I would sugest that you would do best to contact their office directly.  

The slipway has vehicular access, is wide enough for a boat like yours but I could not say just how far the concrete extends under the water - again you would do best to contact the office at the BCC.  

Interesting question whether lengthening Millibee by moving the transom back would reduce drag, and if it would by how much. Almost certainly less wave making but a bit more surface area. If it were me I wouldnt worry about the possible small change in the centre of lateral resistance - if there is a decent size rudder my guess is that you wouldnt notice it.  

I suspect that the equipment and proceedure that we used last time would be inadequate to quantify small changes in drag due to this kind of modification - this kind of measurement really is not so easy in practice as one might imagine.  It will be interesting to see if we can improve a bit on our instrumentation and proceedure.  My own view is that these days this kind of comparison is best carried out theoretically using cfd software which is becoming ever more capable, but it would still be nice to have an experimental method to confirm that there has not been some gross error in applying the cfd.

Port-Na-Storm Port-Na-Storm
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

In reply to this post by John P

Hi John, Thanks for the invitation, it looks like an interesting place to hold a meeting and it's good to find out about new venues. I won't be able to make it as I am away then, hope it goes well.

You are right, HBBR rallies seem to have reduced down to the annual Thames Raid and even that may have lost some of its appeal with the demise of Beale Park. The reasons are as you said, lack of decent venues, lack of interest and lack of drive. It may be that our famous disorganisation and lack of structure actually prevents us doing anything. Discuss.


Regards Graham.


Sent from my Xperia by Sony smartphone



---- John P [via UK HBBR Forum] wrote ----

I am arranging a boating event on the Basingstoke canal under the banner of the Amateur Yacht Research Society and anyone who finds this website of interest would be very welcome to attend. (The same is true for any of the other AYRS meetings - they are not limited to just for AYRS members.)

Actually it was thinking about the HBBR that gave me the idea for this event.  HBBR events seem to have become limited to the 'Thames Raid' which Josephine and myself have completed two and a half times now. But in the early days of the HBBR I have heard that other events were held, so why have they stopped?  I suspect that one reason is that it is not easy to find a venue which combines a campsite and a stretch of water with launch slipway for small craft. (It would be far easier in France than in the UK).  I actually brought a book called 'Camping by the Waterside' by Stephen Neale to try to identify venues that could be suitable for future HBBR gatherings and the Basingstoke Canal Centre looked like a good option in the south east of the country, which, for whatever reason, seems to be the area where most HBBR people are located.  

The idea of this gathering is to offer a weekend of easy boating together with an opportunity to discuss projects, to go out for an evening meal and to help with a practical experiment. The venue is the Basingstoke Canal Centre, Mytchett Place Road, Mytchett, Surrey GU16 6DD   Email [hidden email]   Phone <a href="tel:01252 370073">01252 370073.  The facilities at the BCC include a slipway suitable for launching light craft onto the Basingstoke canal, a cafe, a meeting room and a campsite.  The Basingstoke canal is a very pretty stretch of water but it is not really suitable for sailing since there are low bridges and overhanging trees. However, the same could be said of the annual HBBR Thames trip, it seems that most of the HBBR boats are capable of propulsion by means other than sail. And in any case you dont need to bring a boat to come to this meeting, the canal can be explored via the towpath and indeed when I lived in the South East this was one of my favourite places to go running.

We have booked a meeting room at the BCC for 16:00 on the Saturday afternoon so that people can give presentations on AYRS style yacht research topics but also boating holidays, boat building etc. -  please let me know if you have something to offer. (my contact details below).

We propose to invite donations in the region of £5.00 per head to cover the cost of the meeting room.   We would ask members who bring boats to use on the canal to pay individually for a canal licence, this can be done on-line or on the day at the BCC office - it's £3 per day for all unpowered boats unless you are a member of British Canoeing in which case it is free.  Those who wish to camp at the canal centre should book individually by phone with the BCC office.  The BCC office tells me that they currently have space available on the campsite but I would sugest contacting them as soon as you can if you intend to take this option.


An outline program, given reasonable weather:

Saturday 21st September

•    Arrive and campers put up tents and settle in. Boats launched and canal fees   paid.

•    12:30 Lunch in BCC cafe.

•    From 13:30 convoy along the canal and back (with a tea time canal side picnic stop if weather suits)

•    16:30 Meeting in BCC meeting room to discuss members projects (as Thorpe meetings)- room hire from 16:00 to 19:00.

•    19:30 table booked in local pub or restaurant.  (the Harvester at Frimley Green has been suggested)

Sunday 22nd September

•    09:30 - Breakfast in BCC cafe

•    10:30 - Hull drag measurements for those who are interested in trying that, or as an alternative activity a second convoy along the canal in the opposite direction to Saturday.

•    13:30 Lunch in BCC cafe

•    Pack up and go home (or continue with hull drag measurements, depending on how that is working out)..

 
I hope the mention of a hull drag experiment does not put off HBBR people - you dont have to get involved in this if it is of no interest. It is something that a few AYRS members tried on the Basingstoke canal a couple of years ago.  The idea is to tow small boats along the canal and plot the tow line force against speed so as to compare the drag of different hull shapes and also to compare measured drag with drag that can be predicted by theoretical methods such as the free to download 'Michelet' computer programme.  I have to say that our previous attempt at this gave inconclusive results. For one thing we found that the towline force readings varied widely even at a steady speed - difficulty of keeping the towed boat on a sufficiently straight course may have been the problem.  This time round I hope to have slightly better equipment available including a load cell and data logging software. Suggestions would be welcome as would loan of equipment. The conclusion of this experiment may be that it is not worth trying to compare the drag of hulls in this way, or that such comparison is best left to professionals with proper tow test tanks - if that is the case then it is still a useful thing to have found out so not a failure!  

I am including a picture to give an idea of what the Basingstoke Canal is like.  This was actually taken some miles to the west of the BCC but it does show the nature of the waterway - sea sickness should not be a problem.  The picture also shows Jospehine in the rowing boat I made a couple of years back - Josephine and I have just returned from three weeks in France rowing this boat on four different rivers, will try to get arround to including something about that here as well.

John




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Timmo Timmo
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Re: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

In reply to this post by John P
Thanks for starting the ball rolling on this John. 

All HBBR needs is people to suggest a gathering... I'll try and propose an event in France for next year and see if there are any takers. Just need to select a venue. Of the places I've been with boats Lac de Vassivière in the Limousin is a possibility, so is Lac St Pardoux in the Vienne and Lac de Lavaud in the Charente, but there are no doubt many others, some nearer to a channel port (not my stomping ground.) Too much choice! All hinges on the availability of camping. Some lake shore sites book up years in advance and others are some way from slipways.

Will post something by end of January to give people time to plan for it.

Suggestions for venues, expressions of interest and ideas of suitable dates would be welcome in the meantime.

Back to John's proposal for 21st Sept... I get back from France on the 19th Sept and have family commitments on the Sunday, but aim to get down to Basingstoke for the Saturday if others will be there.

Tim



On 8 Sep 2019, at 14:41, John P [via UK HBBR Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:

I am arranging a boating event on the Basingstoke canal under the banner of the Amateur Yacht Research Society and anyone who finds this website of interest would be very welcome to attend. (The same is true for any of the other AYRS meetings - they are not limited to just for AYRS members.)

Actually it was thinking about the HBBR that gave me the idea for this event.  HBBR events seem to have become limited to the 'Thames Raid' which Josephine and myself have completed two and a half times now. But in the early days of the HBBR I have heard that other events were held, so why have they stopped?  I suspect that one reason is that it is not easy to find a venue which combines a campsite and a stretch of water with launch slipway for small craft. (It would be far easier in France than in the UK).  I actually brought a book called 'Camping by the Waterside' by Stephen Neale to try to identify venues that could be suitable for future HBBR gatherings and the Basingstoke Canal Centre looked like a good option in the south east of the country, which, for whatever reason, seems to be the area where most HBBR people are located.  

The idea of this gathering is to offer a weekend of easy boating together with an opportunity to discuss projects, to go out for an evening meal and to help with a practical experiment. The venue is the Basingstoke Canal Centre, Mytchett Place Road, Mytchett, Surrey GU16 6DD   [hidden email]   Phone 01252 370073.  The facilities at the BCC include a slipway suitable for launching light craft onto the Basingstoke canal, a cafe, a meeting room and a campsite.  The Basingstoke canal is a very pretty stretch of water but it is not really suitable for sailing since there are low bridges and overhanging trees. However, the same could be said of the annual HBBR Thames trip, it seems that most of the HBBR boats are capable of propulsion by means other than sail. And in any case you dont need to bring a boat to come to this meeting, the canal can be explored via the towpath and indeed when I lived in the South East this was one of my favourite places to go running.

We have booked a meeting room at the BCC for 16:00 on the Saturday afternoon so that people can give presentations on AYRS style yacht research topics but also boating holidays, boat building etc. -  please let me know if you have something to offer. (my contact details below).

We propose to invite donations in the region of £5.00 per head to cover the cost of the meeting room.   We would ask members who bring boats to use on the canal to pay individually for a canal licence, this can be done on-line or on the day at the BCC office - it's £3 per day for all unpowered boats unless you are a member of British Canoeing in which case it is free.  Those who wish to camp at the canal centre should book individually by phone with the BCC office.  The BCC office tells me that they currently have space available on the campsite but I would sugest contacting them as soon as you can if you intend to take this option.


An outline program, given reasonable weather:

Saturday 21st September

•    Arrive and campers put up tents and settle in. Boats launched and canal fees   paid.

•    12:30 Lunch in BCC cafe.

•    From 13:30 convoy along the canal and back (with a tea time canal side picnic stop if weather suits)

•    16:30 Meeting in BCC meeting room to discuss members projects (as Thorpe meetings)- room hire from 16:00 to 19:00.

•    19:30 table booked in local pub or restaurant.  (the Harvester at Frimley Green has been suggested)

Sunday 22nd September

•    09:30 - Breakfast in BCC cafe

•    10:30 - Hull drag measurements for those who are interested in trying that, or as an alternative activity a second convoy along the canal in the opposite direction to Saturday.

•    13:30 Lunch in BCC cafe

•    Pack up and go home (or continue with hull drag measurements, depending on how that is working out)..

 
I hope the mention of a hull drag experiment does not put off HBBR people - you dont have to get involved in this if it is of no interest. It is something that a few AYRS members tried on the Basingstoke canal a couple of years ago.  The idea is to tow small boats along the canal and plot the tow line force against speed so as to compare the drag of different hull shapes and also to compare measured drag with drag that can be predicted by theoretical methods such as the free to download 'Michelet' computer programme.  I have to say that our previous attempt at this gave inconclusive results. For one thing we found that the towline force readings varied widely even at a steady speed - difficulty of keeping the towed boat on a sufficiently straight course may have been the problem.  This time round I hope to have slightly better equipment available including a load cell and data logging software. Suggestions would be welcome as would loan of equipment. The conclusion of this experiment may be that it is not worth trying to compare the drag of hulls in this way, or that such comparison is best left to professionals with proper tow test tanks - if that is the case then it is still a useful thing to have found out so not a failure!  

I am including a picture to give an idea of what the Basingstoke Canal is like.  This was actually taken some miles to the west of the BCC but it does show the nature of the waterway - sea sickness should not be a problem.  The picture also shows Jospehine in the rowing boat I made a couple of years back - Josephine and I have just returned from three weeks in France rowing this boat on four different rivers, will try to get arround to including something about that here as well.

John




If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://uk-hbbr-forum.967333.n3.nabble.com/21-22-September-Gathering-on-the-Basingstoke-Canal-tp4031113.html
To start a new topic under HBBR Meetings, [hidden email]
To unsubscribe from UK HBBR Forum, click here.
NAML

Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

In reply to this post by Port-Na-Storm
One reason for a lack of HBBR events is that many of us are also members of the Dinghy Cruising Association (DCA).

There are a large number of DCA events up and down the country, so we just tag along. For example at Cobnor, Chichester Harbour, the DCA Solent group organise a 2 week camping/sailing event during August, which is a glorious holiday.

Most DCA members are equipped to liveaboard, so organisation of events is no harder than sticking a pin in a map. Like a certain individual, I don't do details .

Paul

The Q The Q
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

Sadly my boat isn't ready yet, as the drag testing would be interesting.

 In 3 years or so time When I've retired and the boat is finished. I would be interested in coming to events..

 What is the depth of the canals?

I'm used to sailing with trees and bridges on the broads, ok most are slightly wider. But here is a video of our sailing on the wider bit on the River Ant in 2013, 3 Rivers Race (I'm in Yeoman Y 210) .
https://youtu.be/WOpGhAqFBqg

PS These days I run another guard ship on Hickling broad for this race.
John P John P
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

Hi Q  
I like your video, fun sailing on narrow rivers but the Basingstoke canal is narrower then most of the rivers on the broads and there are quite a lot of low bridges - as with most other canals in the UK sailing in any kin d of boat would be very difficult I think, not really practical.   When we took our dinghy through Holland we were able to sail the canals, but those were canals that are used by 2000 ton barges.

The AYRS is not a very active society these days, some of us would like to revive it a bit.  Most of the meetings are indoors, just people talking about their projects.  Many of the projects discussed by AYRS members are basically boat building projects, they may or may not be innovative (although most boat building projects are a bit innovative) so I think would be of interest to HBBR folk.

With the proposed towing tests now less than 2 weeks away I spent yesterday rigging up a load cell with an arduino microcontroller.  It will need to be connected to a laptop to use it, I havent got time to include data display and storage at this stage.  It will work with speed determined by pressing a button on passing two points on the canal, say 100m appart. I may add a gps module as an alternative way to record speed but I have a suspicion that timing between two points may actually be better considering the low speeds that we will be working with. I happen to have a precision electronic laboratory ballance available and I am pleased that the load cell does give stable readings that aggree with the laboratory ballance within a gram or two.  I am not an electronics engineer so I was pleased to get this far, but its all relatively straightforward these days, a typical school science project I think, maybe even a junior school science project!

I dont know the depth of the Basingstoke canal - maybe a meter or so?  I lived near the canal during the 90's and I do remember it being dredged at that time by an amazing steam dredger that was fascinating to watch in action - smoke and steam gushing out all over!   This dredger is now included in the National Historic Ships register and I think is being restored by a museum in Morcombe.  There are some Utube videos shouwing it in action - for example this one - the dredging starts about 4:40minutes.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4GYAxaeT4k
John P John P
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

Well, a couple of fully paid up HBBR members (i.e. ones that have completed a Thames Raid) have expressed quite strong interest in coming to our meeting at the Basingstoke Canal Centre this weekend. (Note that it's not at Basingstoke - it's near Farnbourough in west Surrey).  So, with the weather looking fair it promises to be a good opportunity to chat about our projects and do some really easy boating  - We can promise no tides, no rapids, no choppy seas and no seasickness.

I have no idea of how many people will be there, maybe half a dozen, maybe a dozen possibly including several members of the AYRS committee.  It would certainly be good to see HBBR folk and if you would like to talk about a boat building project in the meeting room that we have booked for 16:00 Saturday you would be very welcome - we hope to have a screen available for digital pictures.

With a view to the towing trials that we might fit in on Sunday I have been playing with electronics this week.  Pictures show the gadget I have made for measuring the drag and speed of a towed boat.  I am not an electronics engineer, if you are one you can probably tell me how to make it a bit better!





The first picture shows that it is mounted on a piece of plywood. The idea is that this would be attached to a towed boat with clamps, lashings, or maybe just held manually. The towline to a tug would be attached to the purple string that is just showing at the top of the picture.

The second picture shows the inside of the box.  I never meant it to be as complicated as it has become - at first it was just going to be a force measuring device that would send readings of the towline tension to an attached laptop computer.  Then 'mission creep' crept in, bits were added so that it can operate independently of a computer storing the data on an SD card, then timing was added so that towing speed could be determined by pressing a button on passing two objects a known distance apart. Finally a gps receiver was included to give an alternative speed measurment method.   There really isnt space in that small box to add much more !

Details for the weekend are in my first post on this topic.
Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

In reply to this post by John P
John,

It looks fine. Some suggestions:

Vibration is a killer for electronics (especially if you use an engine) so consider:
  Tape around the batteries to stop them falling out.
  Thicker and longer wiring to the battery box, for more physical strength. You could tape the wires to the
  battery box.
  Consider soldering the power directly to the board - the power plug will easily pull out at the wrong
  time! The RC model guys use an inline slide switch for power; alternatively pop out a battery.

I'm not sure about the aluminium foil on the sensor leads. Presumably for screening, but made sure it cannot move with vibration. Ideally screen it to avoid shorting other connections - old PC power supplies often use a plastic mesh tube to gather many cables neatly. A scrap section of that should insulate the foil - other scrap is available. Also large green/yellow earth sheathing would be ideal, find a tame electrician for an offcut.

A 3mm LED and resistor are really useful to confirm that power is reaching the device.

Have you measured the current consumption? GPS devices used to get a bit hungry for power - derate the batteries 50%

cheers
Paul
John P John P
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

Hi Paul, thanks for the useful comments.  

Re batteries, the gadget is built arround a standard Arduino UNO microcontroller board and this can be powered through a USB connector or an alternative connector of the kind with a centre pin in a cylinder.  My picture shows the alternative connector in use but it may be more practical to use the USB connector since this is - well - universal.  I have one of those 'power banks' for charging a phone when away from the mains, its claimed to hold 21amp hours, presumably at 5V, so thats about 100W for an hour which should be plenty.

Agree with your comments about vibration.  The pin connections to the Arduino board seem awfully wobbly but seem to have been OK so far.  Another time I might use an Arduino nano which functions the same as the UNO but is smaller and can be connected by soldering wires directly onto it. There are of course other types of microcontrollers that could be used, maybe you have a favourite?  

Yes, the aluminium foil was to shield the non-amplified signals from the strain gauges in the load cell.  It may well be completely unecessary, I didnt do a test with and without, but it seemed a good precaution at the time.  I agree that there is a danger of it touching live components so I have now wrapped it with insulating tape.  

The combination of load cell and FX711 amplifier seems to work well giving stable and sensitive readings. I am wondering about rigging one up for measuring epoxy - basically just an electronic balance but with some kind of 'null meter' display so that as you pour in the epoxy you can see it approaching the point at which the mix ratio is correct, then if you go a bit too far you just add a few drops from the other bottle  and so on until you get it just right.  Mind you, I have heard of a little seesaw with unequal length legs that would do something similar.

Unfortunately, when I added code for the GPS system into the software I started to get eratic readings.  I can make the GPS work fine when the software does not include the loadcell measurement and I can make the loadcell work fine when the GPS is not included, but not both together.  I suspect I am about at the the limit set by the amount of dynamic memory in the UNO board and this cannot be increased.  So maybe I have  found the limit of what can be done with an Arduino UNO. An Arduino Mega might solve the problem but it is physically bigger so wouldnt fit the box and I dont want to rebuild the whole thing at this stage. Still, the unit does do timing over a set distance as an alternative to GPS speed measurement, or a smartphone could be used to measure speed then enter that data later on.

Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

John

For wobbly connections a hot glue gun is a quick fix.

Lacing all the wires together is standard practice for aircraft - it stops individual wires vibrating.
The theory is that anything vibrating will eventually self-destruct.

Paul
John P John P
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

I think the meeting at the Basingstoke Canal Centre (BCC) worked out fine.  My outline plan for Saturday was a cruise along the canal with a pub or picnic stop, leaving the hull drag experiment for Sunday.  However, rather to my surprise, everyone seemed keen to get started with the experiment straight away on Saturday, then on Sunday the weather was not so good for a cruise so we fitted in more experimental work during a dry spell on Sunday afternoon.

I will write an account of the weekend, including the experimental work, for the AYRS and I should be able to post a link on this forum. In the meantime, I would like to say that I think that the BCC would make a good venue for a future HBBR event, camping on the BCC camping field and doing day trips in both directions along the canal. HBBR member Alastair was with us this past weekend and I think he would agree on this.  Indeed, Alastair had the thought that not only could there be a weekend event at the BCC but possibly there could be a longer tour taking in the R. Kennet (say from Pewsey or Newbury), the R. Thames, the R. Wey and then the Basingstoke Canal.  

I have just had a further thought that perhaps this could even be our very own replacement for Beale Park (assuming that BP really is no more).   I can imagine that Pete Greenfield might quite like to continue his boat building awards if only to generate copy for his magazine, but he would presumably need a venue where the boats can be displayed and judged and ideally where keen amateur boat builders could meet, chat about boats and buy subscriptions to 'Watercraft'.  Not a full boat show like Beale Park, but a gathering that could be advertised to readers of Watercraft and perhaps also to students and teachers from the three(?) UK boat building schools.  And if any of the exhibitors from BP would like to come and show their products to a smaller, but possibly more relevant, audience, they would be welcome too - so maybe a mini boat show after all.  I just thought that the BCC might be a suitable venue for such a plan (mind you, I haven't mentioned this to either BCC or Pete). My reasons for thinking this are:

 ---Easily accessible from the motorway network and close to large centers of population, not least London
 ---A sizeable grass area immediately outside the BCC main building - I would have thought there would be space here to display a dozen or so small boats but if this is not suitable perhaps a section of the large adjacent camping field could be cordoned off for boat display.
 ----A campsite on quite a large field.
---- An on site cafe open through the day
---- A meeting room that could be hired for an award ceremony and/or for talks about boat design/building.
---- An attractive stretch of waterway, suitable for demonstrating canoes, rowboats, low powered motor boats and static display of sailing boats (but not suitable for actual sailing).


 After every one else had departed last weekend, Josephine and myself went for a row down the canal on Sunday evening and another in the opposite direction on Monday morning. Its a remarkably pretty waterway with a number of small lakes that branch off the canal and which have been made into nature reserves.
 
 A note about boat launching at the BCC.   The canal bank at the BCC is quite low and mostly capped with timber. Boats that can be manhandled, i.e. canoes and rowing boats, can be simply slipped over into the canal and there are low wooden stagings for boarding.  Boats on trailers that need to be wheeled right down to the water, or on trailers that need to be immersed for launching, cannot be launched at the BCC but there is a public slipway just a couple of hundred meters along the canal in the Basingstoke direction. This public slipway is accessed through the car park of Potts PH and the pub locks the gate across the slipway 'for safety reasons'.  However, they said that if asked they will unlock the gate for a £10 donation to a local hospital charity.
LASER41420 LASER41420
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

Sounds like an excellent plan to me.
Regards
Steve
Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

In reply to this post by John P
John,

That's a compelling argument for a BP replacement.

The key point would be promoting to interested people. Those interested in dinghies, canoes, tenders and electric power is an obvious choice, and there will be others.

No dog rescues please.

Paul
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

Electric power is the future for canals and rivers. Eventually those huge diesels will be taxed out of existence.

The public has fallen in love with electric cars and solar power; one could capitalise on that by showing electric conversion of everything from canoes to canal boats.

Paul
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

My report on the meeting at the Basingstoke Canal Centre attached.

19-09-28_Report_on_AYRS_weekend_meeting_at_the_Basingstoke_Canal_Centre.pdf
The Q The Q
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

In reply to this post by Paul (admin)
They put electric power on many moorings on the broads,  the public use them to power their hair straighteners..
But still drive with diesel...
LASER41420 LASER41420
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

Hi,

Latest study from Germany shows that over its lifetime an electric car is more polluting than a diesel because fossil fuels are used to generate the electricity. Unless we rediscover our love of nuclear power stations that is unlikely to change. Powered leisure boating is more likely to be banned than converted to electric drive.

Be careful what you wish for (and make some oars)

Steve
Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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RE: 21/22 September - Gathering on the Basingstoke Canal

LASER41420 wrote
.....fossil fuels are used to generate the electricity. Unless we rediscover our love of nuclear power stations that is unlikely to change.
Don't forget solar, wind and tidal power.

Peak solar power coincides with peak holiday use of cars/boats.

Wind power is getting cheaper. It's far cheaper than nuclear already. Offshore wind investment is high.

Severn tidal barrier could produce 7% of the UK electrical consumption.

Also we have a 2 Giga Watt link with France, who have a high proportion of nuclear. Could import more - imagine the fun.

Fusion is doable I'm told, but expensive. Two fusion reactors alternating 30 seconds each, cycling like a slow 2CV.

Drop speed limits to 50, like the Opec oil crisis in the 1970s. Fit accelaration limiters. That saves a huge amount of energy.

Electric bicycles are the future I think. Very little energy needed.

Paul
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