Ahoy!

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CPVH CPVH
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Ahoy!

Hi,

Chris Here,  

I have just become a member of HBBR - courtesy of readiing the homepage !:^*>))
and thought i'd introduce myself.  I am the wrong side of 50, and pretty much a newbie when it comes to sailing.  

I don't see myslelf building or even buying a boat in the forseeable future, but will be interested to follow others progress here.

 My daughter is intending to buy a boat soon, but she will probably go for a second hand boat. Currently she's pining for an Enterprise, but I am wondering if something a little smaller (she's approx 5 foot and slight) might be better suited both to her physique and to allow me to transport it easily whilst still towing a trailer full of camping gear.

Here endeth the introduction.

Cheers

Chris

Timmo Timmo
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Re: Ahoy!

Welcome aboard.

I hope the bug bites and you end up giving building a go. While it's important that all non boat builders remain in awe of the skill and knowledge creating a boat involves, it can actually be very straightforward and equally satisfying!

The Enterprise is a nice boat to sail, room in it for a friend or two and a picnic as well. Provided she's not too bold to know when to reef it would be one your daughter could handle.

A trailer load of camping gear plus an Enterprise sounds difficult. She's no car topper and I've learned the hard way it's best not to put too much gear in a boat on a trailer. You're looking for a boat that can be lifted on top of a trailer carrying the camping gear or onto the car roof I think.

Most modern car top sailing dinghies are quite high performance designs, great fun but wetter to sail. They're likely to have thriving club racing scenes to get involved.  Less likely to be conducive to taking friends and picnics along.

Would be interesting to know what sort of sailing your daughter has in mind if you're inclined to trigger a flow of well informed and potentially contradictory suggestions and advice.

Tim.



On 28 Feb 2014, at 11:26, CPVH [via UK HBBR Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hi,

Chris Here,  

I have just become a member of HBBR - courtesy of readiing the homepage !:^*>))
and thought i'd introduce myself.  I am the wrong side of 50, and pretty much a newbie when it comes to sailing.  

I don't see myslelf building or even buying a boat in the forseeable future, but will be interested to follow others progress here.

 My daughter is intending to buy a boat soon, but she will probably go for a second hand boat. Currently she's pining for an Enterprise, but I am wondering if something a little smaller (she's approx 5 foot and slight) might be better suited both to her physique and to allow me to transport it easily whilst still towing a trailer full of camping gear.

Here endeth the introduction.

Cheers

Chris




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Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Ahoy!

In reply to this post by CPVH
As Tim said the Enterprise is too heavy for one lightweight and is designed to be sailed by a 2 man crew.

For a solo sailor the Mirror ticks a lot of boxes and you can cut your teeth on simple modifications or repairs to the wooden hull and fittings.

For an exciting and fast sail go the Laser or RS route. ..but a wetsuit becomes essential!

Cheers
Paul

LASER41420 LASER41420
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Re: Ahoy!

Hi,
Not a bad idea the Mirror, there are plenty of old affordable ones around and several have been used for epic journeys. Laser's are great fast racing fun, and come with 3 different rigs to suit all body sizes. How experienced a sailor are we talking about here?
Steve
(Laser, Mermaid & Wanderer sailor)
Frogsider Frogsider
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Re: Ahoy!

This post was updated on .
In reply to this post by CPVH
Hello Chris,

The Jack Holt designed Miracle is a good substitute for an Enterprise.  It is about the same size and has an even simpler rig, but it is a lot lighter and has a slightly sportier look.  It is an excellent beginners' boat but capable of exciting performance in more experienced hands.  Importantly, it is a bit easier to right and bail out after a capsize than an Enterprise.

Slightly neglected examples can be found at very reasonable prices, so you could do a bit of restoration with a paintbrush, some sandpaper and a screwdriver, becoming, in the process, a ukhbbr guru.
Chris Partridge Chris Partridge
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Re: Ahoy!

In reply to this post by CPVH
Hi Chris,
Chris here (not to be confused with Chris, Chris or the other Chris).
What do you mean by camping? Is your daughter planning to go to regattas and compete in the boat, while camping ashore, or are you all going camping so she can sail while you watch?
That will dictate whether the boat or the camping gear is in the trailer, presumably. As others have mentioned, you aren't going to get an Enterprise on top of the car.
My first build was a Conrad Natzio Sandpiper, which is dead easy with all straight cuts. Very light, easy to sail, suitable for lighter sailers as well as those at the other end of the spectrum (I'm 6ft 4in and fairly robustly built).
Frogsider Frogsider
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Re: Ahoy!

Yes, Chris - but I think Chris's daughter is going to buy, not build, a boat.  If she gets an old Miracle, which, at 59kg, is about the same weight as a Laser - or about 60% the weight of an Enterprise - Chris (the OP) could help her with an amusing little restoration project.  

Moreover, said daughter will find lots of other young Miracle sailors with whom to sail, socialize, and possibly race.

All the best to all you Chris's

Patrick
Alan Alan
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Re: Ahoy!

I second the Miracle option: uncluttered cockpit, easy to launch/recover single handed and can be sailed and recovered from a capsize single handed.
CPVH CPVH
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Re: Ahoy!

In reply to this post by CPVH
I want to reply to a few people, so thought the simplest way was to reply to myself.....

My daughter has dome her RYA 2, and has clocked up a reasonable ammount of time both with CCF at school, and on a few 1 week dighy sailing courses, so all in all much more profficient than me (I did spend a whole day piloting a Pico a while back, doing ovals on a lake, and capsizing at the same end on each circuit.  If somebody had told me I was gybing at that end, and if I pushed the tiller the other way i'd tack instead, I would have got a lot less wet!

We went to the RYA show on Saturday, but didn't pay the Miracle much attention, as it looked a bit big, and I do have a great fear of wood (our gates and conservatory are dropping to bits as i've not found time over the years to maintain them and i'm afraid a woden boat in my/our hands would go the same way which would be criminal.

I did point out the Mirror to my wife (my daughter couldn't be with us) but she found it's transome at both ends design inelegant.  The Miracle does look prettier (no offence to present Mirror owning company), but i'm not sure about wood.  Anna on the other hand wants something that doesn't look like everybody elses boat.  So I may yet be persuaded.
LASER41420 LASER41420
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Re: Ahoy!

Hi,
Are you intending to join a particular club near you? Their noticeboards are often a good source of starter boats.
Steve
simplesimon simplesimon
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Re: Ahoy!

In reply to this post by CPVH
What part of the world are you in, and where does your daughter want to sail?
(I suspect the answer is SE England, as you got to Ally Pally, but N, S, E, or W of London makes a difference)

Cheers
Simon
CPVH CPVH
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Re: Ahoy!

It must be my received pronunciation comming through in my typing.  We are indeed in the SE 9near Horsham)  I have been looking at the Crawley Mariner's web site, and Also Dell Quay.  If you have any other suggestions for clubs, please suggest away.

Cheers
Chris
CPVH CPVH
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Re: Ahoy!

In reply to this post by simplesimon
Hi,

I forgot to say in my last reply, i've not really checked where she wants to said, other than at TARS events (at Cobnor and (this year at least) a lake), she would also want to be able to take it up to the Lake District if/when we go up.  

I am coming round to the idea of a road trailer for whatever boat she eventually gets, and either taking a second car for additional gear if/when we go on combined camping and sailing trips, or else perhaps getting the dinghy trailer modified so it can take a little of the camping load in addition to the boat (I have a tame trailer man who can advise or do any modifications).

I am as I said in another post also considering joining a club and sailing more often (it's GCSE year for Anna though, and she has a busy summer booked up so she wouldn't be able to do much near home till late in the season).  
Alan Alan
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Re: Ahoy!

Weir Wood Sailing Club is quite near Horsham.
Chris Partridge Chris Partridge
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Re: Ahoy!

In reply to this post by CPVH
Bosham SC also uses Cobnor. Emsworth has two clubs, and Langstone is a friendly club close to where I row. Several Langstone Cutters rowing club members are also sailing club members and I can put you in touch if you want.