Hello from Devon

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bigdave bigdave
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Hello from Devon

Hi I have joined the forum because I am looking for a boat to build something to sail in the estuary forage sea food spend the odd night out and take on camping trips elsewhere. I have been looking at the Goat island skiff but it looks a tad boxy my dad has given me a plan by Iain Oughtred for the seahorse skiff but lookin through the forum there seems to be plenty of designs to choose from I have an 18' gaffer that I fitted out from a FG hull but it sits on a drying mooring and I can't get out as much as I'd like.

The GIS looks quick and easy to build but the shape lets it down any recommendations? I sail alone I'm 6'3" ideally a lug rig I'm not looking for hug performance sea keeping is more important .

Dave
Timmo Timmo
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Re: Hello from Devon

Timmo Timmo
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Re: Hello from Devon

Welcome Dave, my first reply came out blank somehow so this is a second go...

So many possible designs!

I tend to agree about the Goat Island Skiff.

Saw your enquiry about the Sea Horse Skiff on Wooden Boat forum. The Sea Horse Skiff  as far as I remember is a fairly light flat bottomed dagger board boat with a sprit sail. Never seen one for real, just line drawings. All Oughtred boats are pretty but I'm not sure whether the compromises on this design to make it light and quick to rig will actually make it frustrating to sail. It's a very personal judgment but I prefer a proper pivoting centreboard and a higher aspect rig if sailing is the primary purpose. I've an Acorn Skiff and while I enjoy sailing her I'm hankering after a boat better designed specifically for sailing. As someone who is also around 6'3" it can be good to have some room to move around. Plenty of other Oughtred designs that could fit the bill though. Tammie Norrie is one that I have an eye on (or more likely it's bigger sibling... Penny Fee.)

Have you looked at the Welsford Walkabout? Was designed almost exactly for the situations you describe and it has quite nice lines. It's alo on my list of possible next builds (a list that only grows longer!)

Even prettier are the Francois Vivier designs, the new Stir Ven 19 (http://francois.vivier.info/pdf/stirven19.pdf) looks particularly interesting and has displaced the Ilur as a possible build for me. Francois has a whole stable of classic looking craft that perform well.

Then there's Andrew Wolstenholme, Graham 'PortNaStorm' has just put his very lovely Coot up for sale. Probably a bit small for your needs but the larger Mallard or Swallow are just as nice (and with their Gunter rigs have a little less rigging than the Coot!)

Not sure you'll get any specific guidance as to what boat to build on this forum, you are likely to get a lot of suggestions as well as some debate. We'll all be interested in what you decide and in news of the build.

Tim.
bigdave bigdave
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Re: Hello from Devon

Thanks the plan for the Seahorse shows a centreboard i doubt I'll go for it due to lack of online info on it. I don't want to go to big as our last build was supposed to be a trailer sailer and i ended up with a near 2ton gaffer. which is the problem i would like to be more independent than that allows but i don't want to spend years building a boat. the French one looks lovely but i fear that will be a long build which is why i had been looking at the whilly tern etc. i have plenty of time to choose a design as i can do nothing till the end of the year.


Dave
Port-Na-Storm Port-Na-Storm
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Re: Hello from Devon

Hi Big Dave and welcome.
I agree with Tim the Coot probably isn't the boat for you, but if you're looking for a seaworthy boat which is easy to row and quite a quick build with lines to die for then I'd seriously consider one of Iain O's double enders.  


I've built the Whilly Tern which might just be a little neat for you so maybe the Tirrik would suit your needs.
Cheers
Graham
bigdave bigdave
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Re: Hello from Devon

Yes I do like the whilly tern and tirrik I'm just a little apprehensive of the build which is why I'm scouring the forum and net reading as much as I can.

Are there any home build books that are worth looking at?


Dave
Timmo Timmo
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Re: Hello from Devon

Iain Oughtred's book is one I read and reread many times before my first lapstrake build. Highly recommend it.

Tim.

On 15 Jan 2014, at 19:03, bigdave [via UK HBBR Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Are there any home build books that are worth looking at?
>
>
> Dave


Port-Na-Storm Port-Na-Storm
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Re: Hello from Devon

Hi
I agree Iain's book is very good. The other one I'd recommend is Tom Hill's Ultralight Boatbuilding especially for clinker ply, but Iain's is the best all round book covering all aspects of the build.

If you want to cut down the time then I'd recommend a plank kit from Alec Jordan at Jordan Boats

cheers
Graham
bigdave bigdave
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Re: Hello from Devon

The kits are just for the ply planks am i right!. i don't suppose that's bad considering the ply would be about £100 a sheet plus saves marking out. i do like the look of the double enders lots more thought required me thinks. i would probably have to build outside undercover unless i can find a local indoor space to build in.

Dave
Port-Na-Storm Port-Na-Storm
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Re: Hello from Devon

Hi Dave,
Yes the kits are for the plywood planks only, plus you get all the necessary MDF moulds if you go for Clinker Ply. You can save a bit on waste as Alec nests the planks economically onto the sheets, he only uses Robbins elite ply. You do have to factor in the delivery costs which can be over £100.
I built the Whilly Tern from scratch but when I realised the Coot had ten planks per side I decided to go the kit route.
Others will know I don't get any commission, but Alec is a friend.
bigdave bigdave
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Re: Hello from Devon

So which would better suit estuary sailing the Exe. and Teign.
being the main ones with the odd dart. trip thrown in, Whilly tern or Terrik?.

Dave

alopenboat alopenboat
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Re: Hello from Devon

On 16 Jan 2014 at 12:00, bigdave [via UK HBBR Forum] wrote:

>
>
> So which would better suit estuary sailing the Exe. and Teign.
> being the main ones with the odd dart. trip thrown in, Whilly tern or
> Terrik?.
>
> Dave
>

I am not up on the boats but your local cruising grounds have very
different characters and, I would think, would suit very different
boats.

The Exe and the Teign, if you intend to stay in the estuary, support
fairly limited cruising, as far as distance is concerned, but fast
tides that don't leave much water at low tide.

On the Dart you will find more varied conditions and greater scope,
but the Plymouth rivers could keep you occupied all season.

--
Hoping for calm nights

Alastair Law
Yeovil, England.
<http://www.little.jim.freeuk.com>

bigdave bigdave
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Re: Hello from Devon

I'm looking for something I can hitch and go on summers evenings and camping weekends something my gaffer doesn't allow at the moment as I can only get out and in 2 hrs either side of high water so restricted with timings often cracking sailing days go by with me being high and dry.

I'll often be on my own so it needs to be easy to handle and quick to rig so I think a lug would be ideal I have a 12' rowing boat and thought it be a good size so 14-16 seems good enough for my needs.

Dave
Port-Na-Storm Port-Na-Storm
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Re: Hello from Devon

In reply to this post by bigdave
OK having tried to talk you into an IO double ender I'm probably just about to talk you out of it.

On your original post you said
"something to sail in the estuary forage sea food spend the odd night out and take on camping trips elsewhere."

I'm guessing you mean you want to sleep aboard? Which is a quaint habit the English have picked up due to the friendly attitude of landowners. Unlike in Scotland where the friendly locals are only too delighted for you to pitch up and make free and easy with the foreshore. So when Iain Oughtred talks about Dinghy Cruising he means sleeping on the beach. (You'll have guessed, as others know, I'm not from round these parts. )

You won't sleep in a Whilly Tern unless you are double jointed, the Tirrik might be OK but you didn't here it from me.

The down side to those long thin double enders which slide thorough the water with elegant ease is that they have narrow waterlines, are a wee bit tippy and actually don't have that much room inside.

I say old chap there's not much room in there!
Anyway, the Whilly Tern is the Tirrik's  little sister, you can read a bit about them, and peruse some other designs here Classic Marine Boat Plans

I'd go for the Tirrik.

Confused? You will be.
bigdave bigdave
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Re: Hello from Devon

I do mean sleeping on dry land in or out of the boat i have wild camped a fair bit with canoes so know the drill.

Dave
John P John P
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Re: Hello from Devon

In reply to this post by bigdave
Hi Dave, since you say you are in Devon you might be interested to come along to the DCA Devon meeting that we are holding on Saturday Feb 22nd.   Send me a message if interested.  Although this is under the DCA banner, it's open to all those interested in dinghy cruising, only thing is that numbers may need to be limited. We have been holding these meetings each winter for a few years now and so far have been able to fit everyone into our house for the evening but each year I wonder if I am going to have to rush round at the last moment to hire a room somewhere.

Could be an opportunity to chat to others about your boat requirements.

John
bigdave bigdave
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Re: Hello from Devon

I have sent a message John I've not heard of the DCA sounds interesting and fun the mind boggles the amount of camping gear I could carry in a dinghy. I have looked at the DCA site their seems to be a good diversity of boats being used.

Dave

David Bewick David Bewick
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Re: Hello from Devon

In reply to this post by bigdave
Dave,

At the risk of boring everyone else on here who has heard it all before, I would suggest you have a good look at Francois Vivier's designs.  I have an Aber and I live near Kingsbridge if you would like to have a look at one "in the flesh".  Aber is a genuine sail and oar boat that I can handle on my own, if need be.  I like many other of Francois' designs, too, and I might well build another, one day.

Regards,

David.
bigdave bigdave
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Re: Hello from Devon

This post was updated on .
I have looked at his designs and do like them specialy as the dinghy cruising looks to be the way i might go. the only slight issue with the designs i have is i'm not sure about the shearline but i guess i could alter that when building i think it would look better with slightly more curve.

Saying that looking at the Aler she looks fine I was looking at the Minahouet. Their are a lot of planks involved and quite a bit of building by the looks.

Dave
John P John P
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Re: Hello from Devon

In reply to this post by bigdave
bigdave wrote
I have looked at the DCA site their seems to be a good diversity of boats being used.
Dave
You can use any boat you like, it really doesn't matter. Well, maybe not one with a cabin, and maybe not a huge one, and maybe not a motor boat!
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