Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

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BrianP BrianP
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Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

It would be really great if between us we could "design" a generic trailer which can be made at home without needing welding or galvanising. When I saw the picture of Jeremy's alloy bolted and riveted trailer for his solar boat, I realised that here was exactly the perfect trailer to build at home for any of our lightweight boats - so many of us now use lightweight rowboats, or sailing canoes. At 16' long they are car toppable but a lightweight trailer would be far superior, being much less hassle and easy to handle on your own.

What do you think? A parts listing with attached suppliers. Dimensions for a 16' long canoe/rowboat, beam about 4' or so?

Here's that picture I mentioned of Jeremy's trailer.



An added refinement might be a detachable front towing bracket, replaced by a dinghy trolley front wheel. These 16' long boats will not fit my garage, well the boat fits but the trailer front sticks out. If it was detachable then I could close the garage door properly.

Brian
Jeremy Jeremy
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

I've attached a pdf file of the trailer for my electric Winsome (which also worked OK for Aero, I've discovered), together with a DXF file that anyone with a CAD package can open and pull off dimensions etc.

Some of the details, like bolt and hole locations aren't on the drawing, because these were just marked and drilled as I went along, the drawing was really just so that I could get the dimensions right so that the hull would fit OK.

Jeremy

Winsome_trailer.pdf

Winsome_Trailer_Drawing.DXF
Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

In reply to this post by BrianP
Illusion's trailer is bolted together.

It's not difficult - the critical item is the axle and suspension units. The most important tools are a small drill press and a good quality 8mm drill (8mm bolts on suspension).

I used 25mm box section and made a jig accuratly drilling an 8mm hole in a short section. Clamp the jig to the first box section and drive the 8mm drill through both in the drill press.

The jig ensures the holes are consistently central, the drill press ensures holes are 100% vertical.

Thereafter measure and drill in one half only - clamp the other half to it with 8mm bolts in existing holes then drill through the new hole. Then left/right sections will have identical holes spacings, so everything becomes interchangeable.

In fact if we got our act together we could make a jig with varying hole pitches for different lengths and share it around.

-Paul
Say NO to Brexit. Kick it into the long grass
Jeremy Jeremy
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

My trailer is a mix of bolts and big blind rivets.  The main problem to overcome when bolting up box section material is stopping the bolts coming loose due to the section crushing slightly under the bolt compressive force.

I overcame this in two ways.  Critical bolts have either an internal tube fitted to take the compressive loads (easy to do, see the diagram below for one method) or they have internal stiffening sections slid inside.  The forward keel section and the axle section of my aluminium alloy trailer use inserts made from pultruded GRP (see here for a source: http://www.exelcomposites.com/English/Products/ExelStandardProfilesandTubes/ExelStandardProfiles/RectangularProfiles/tabid/7756/language/en-US/Default.aspx).  The 44mm x 44mm x 6mm pultruded rectangular section is a nice, fairly tight, sliding fit inside 2" x 2" x 1/8" stock alloy box section and not only adds a lot of stiffness but also makes the box very resistant to crushing by bolt loads.



The anti-crush tube shown above is a thin wall tube that is fitted right through the box section, via holes drilled and lightly countersunk on either side.  Once cut to exactly the same length as the width of the box section, the anti-crush tube is lightly riveted in place by placing a ball bearing in either end and squeezing it in a vice or clamp.  The faces are then gently filed flush to the tube.  This method allows anti-crush tubes to be fitted in places where it would be impossible to insert them from the ends of the box section.  To get reasonably good performance from this joint it's best to use large diameter washers on any bolts on exposed box section faces, to spread the load.  I usually Loctite these washers in place to avoid corrosion.

Jeremy
BrianP BrianP
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

Thanks Jeremy for posting the drawings and the technical info. I currently cannot read DXF files and it would be useful for other files I have and cannot read, if I installed a DXF reader, or low grade CAD package. When I searched on the internet many options came up for downloading DXF readers but fear overcame me, and did not know which one was safe to download. Do you,or any others, know of a reliable safe download DXF reader? Thanks, Brian.
Jeremy Jeremy
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

As far as I know, the Autodesk file viewer for AutoCAD should be OK, although I've not used it.  There is a free download here, on the Autodesk wensite that should be trustworthy: http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/pc/index?id=6703438&siteID=123112

If it won't read the DXF file properly, then I can always post the file as an AutoCAD DWG file instead.  It should allow you to view, print and take dimensions from any DXF or DWG file I believe.

There are also some cheap, or even free, CAD programmes around that will read DXF files OK.  I know that there was was a free version of Turbocad available a while ago, so that might be worth exploring.  It wasn't a current version being offered by Turbocad on their website, but was a promotion, I think, aimed at getting people to acquire Turbocad skills and then get locked in to their way of doing things.

CAD is a pretty steep learning curve.  I learned to use AutoCAD back in around 1985 and, despite it's arcane user interface find that I'm unwilling to switch to something else.  I've got both Rhino and Solidworks installed, and although both are significantly more capable than AutoCAD in many ways I find it very hard to use them.  I think the main problem is that I use CAD simply as a substitute for pencil and paper, which AutoCAD does very well.  The newer and more advanced CAD packages approach things as if one had never acquired basic technical drawing skills, which seems counter intuitive to me.

Jeremy
Anders Anders
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

Where do you get the suspension units?
Port-Na-Storm Port-Na-Storm
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

Anders Anders
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

Thanks.
They arent really something I´d call cheap, so ask myself if its worth it building your own trailer.
alopenboat alopenboat
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

If you are intending to trailer-sail your boat it is my opinion that
it is worth spending significant money if it makes it easy to trail
and launch. You are much more likely to nip off for a quick sail if
launching is a simple, low effort, procedure.


On 9 Sep 2011 at 9:16, Anders [via UK HBBR Forum] wrote:

>
>
> Thanks.
> They arent really something I´d call cheap, so ask myself if its
> worth it building your own trailer.
>
--
Hoping for calm nights

Alastair Law,
Yeovil, England.
<http://www.little.jim.freeuk.com>

Port-Na-Storm Port-Na-Storm
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

In reply to this post by Anders
Hi,
I suppose it depends where you're starting from.

Your probably couldn't build your own trailer cheaper than buying a new one, but that's hardly surprising as there will be a built in profit margin on each part rather than the whole thing, and the manufacturer can buy in bulk.

About the cheapest new road trailer around would be this, Mirror_Road_Trailer at £380.

However, these units do mean you can upgrade an old trailer or build one from scrap bits.

Some countries, e.g. The Netherlands insist that all trailers are type approved and carry a CE mark. Thankfully the UK still allow you to build one from old bed ends, I wouldn't like to guess where the Spanish stand on that.

Anders Anders
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

Dont guess about Spanish law. Just forget it. Its impossible to understand even for spaniards

As far as I know, the "free build yourself a trailer times in the UK" will be over very soon. New EU laws will mean that you can only buy and use EU homulogated trailers with a CE number.
This mean that you can import trailers from the UK to Spain without any problems. (someone cryes and others get happy)
Port-Na-Storm Port-Na-Storm
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

The world is going to hell in a Hand Cart.

That would be an EU approved CE homulogated  Hand Cart.
Jeremy Jeremy
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

It's worth remembering that if they do insist on all trailers being CE marked they can only apply it to newly built trailers, not existing ones.  Who's to say how old a trailer is?  Maybe I should buy in a stock of trailer parts now so I can claim that any trailer I make in future will be pre-the new rules (I did this for electrical cable - I still have half a roll of each size of the old colours in the loft so I can carry on DIY wiring without having to pay the exorbitant costs of a Part P inspection).

Timmo Timmo
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

I ran out of old cable. Went and took my 'domestic installer' exams. Means, provided I notify building inspectorate before I start work, I can now install and test new installations and provide the building inspector with the necessary paperwork for them to issue a Part P compliance certificate. If it's ever necessary I'm sure we could 'work together' on an installation to satisfy the legal requirements.

Must admit it's a load of tosh. It's easy and legal to add an extra socket to a lethal old installation working off wired fuses and still using lead sheathed cable in places. If you choose instead to take out that old circuit and replace it with safe, up to date systems you get tangled in all sorts of legal constraints!

Even many professional electricians think it's a law too far.

Tim.

From: "Jeremy [via UK HBBR Forum]" <[hidden email]>
Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2011 05:57:04 -0700 (PDT)
To: Tim O'Connor <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

It's worth remembering that if they do insist on all trailers being CE marked they can only apply it to newly built trailers, not existing ones.  Who's to say how old a trailer is?  Maybe I should buy in a stock of trailer parts now so I can claim that any trailer I make in future will be pre-the new rules (I did this for electrical cable - I still have half a roll of each size of the old colours in the loft so I can carry on DIY wiring without having to pay the exorbitant costs of a Part P inspection).




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Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

Timmo wrote
Even many professional electricians think it's a law too far.
I'll refrain from commenting because the whole system is so annoying I usually end up blowing a fuse!

-Paul
Say NO to Brexit. Kick it into the long grass
Anders Anders
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Re: Home build trailer - no welding - no galvanising

In reply to this post by Jeremy
Another thing is that trailers will be a lot more expensive with all the CE things and dings. Here in Spain, a homulogated combi trailer that´ll cost you some 550,-pounds in the UK, cost exactly the doble....
Its completely far out... I even asked for a shipping quote inside Spain and it was 600,-€
So, thats why i¨m here on this thread.
I´m considering building an illegal dinghy and an illegal roadtrailer. but most probably it´ll have to be an illegal dinghy which I´ll cartop.

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