Matching mahogany

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Chris Partridge Chris Partridge
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Matching mahogany

I say chaps...as many of you know, I am restoring an old Thames lock keeper's punt, which I am now informed was usually referred to as a Hampshire punt.
The new bottom is on, and the next step is to fill some old screw holes in the solid mahogany sides. I have retained a quantity of sanding dust which is therefore of exactly the right colour. What is the best medium - epoxy? Or would I get results just as good from a standard tin of mahogany-coloured filler?
momist momist
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Re: Matching mahogany

Definitely NOT the standard filler.  In fact, what do you mean by standard filler?  In my experience, there are about five different shades described as "mahogany" in each different brand of filler, and non of them end up the right colour.  Also, the waterproof and mechanical integrity of them all differ with brand, and composition.  They are mainly made to give an easy fix rather than a durable and matching result.  

The best solution is of course to drill parallel sided holes to sink the screws in, and fill with a tapered plug made with a quality plug cutter from the same source material as the wood you are working with.  I do understand that this is not possible in many (most?) cases.  If you have the sawdust available, and clear epoxy available, and never want to reach those screws again, then I would use that solution.

Good luck,
Ian
Chris Partridge Chris Partridge
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Thanks, Ian - I did that and the results are good. The epoxy/sawdust paste was very dark and I had some doubts about the final colour but it is a very good match. Now...more sanding...
Which brings me to the next thing: the boat is missing most of the floorboards, the rowing footrest and the removable thwart has, of course, been removed. Has anyone got any mahogany shelves or such that might be suitable? The floorboards are made up of 1.5in by 2in strips as you would find in a Thames punt.
I don't have to repeat the rant about the cost, unsustainability and general rubbishness of timber merchants' so-called mahogany in this forum, I know. My usual source, the amazing Inksters, is out of recycled mahog.
momist momist
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Re: Matching mahogany

Sorry Chris.

The one nice piece of mahogany I have left has been earmarked already for a project of my own.  It's a substantial door frame from an old public building that was removed back in the 'eighties when a modern entrance was substituted, and I've been hanging on to it since then.  Even the modern entrance is now long gone . . .

Ian
Timmo Timmo
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Re: Matching mahogany

In reply to this post by Chris Partridge
Hi Chris

Hopefully there will be offers of stock of more useful dimensions and nearer to home for you.

If not you're welcome to a piece of the staircase I rescued from someone's wood burner. I think it's Utile but not absolutely sure. Certainly some species of mahogany.

Most has emigrated to France now but I do have a lump here of about 140cm by 7cm by 14cm (if I remember rightly!) The mortices cut into are about 2cm deep it but it's a big chunky piece of timber so you should be able to get something useful from it. I've cut up another piece like this and got four window frames for the barn in France plus spare bits out of it. You may need to recruit help from someone with a largish circular saw or bandsaw.


Whether it's worth the trip up here to Banbury to get it is another matter! If you did get here there's also a piece of newel post that might be useful to you. About 10cm square section, nearer a metre long with a two mortices cut into each of two faces.

Next time I'm south again will be late Boxing Day (heading for the overnight Portsmouth to Caen ferry.) If you can wait till then we can arrange a handover round Port Solent or somewhere.

Tim.


On 4 Dec 2014, at 09:31, Chris Partridge [via UK HBBR Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Thanks, Ian - I did that and the results are good. The epoxy/sawdust paste was very dark and I had some doubts about the final colour but it is a very good match. Now...more sanding...
Which brings me to the next thing: the boat is missing most of the floorboards, the rowing footrest and the removable thwart has, of course, been removed. Has anyone got any mahogany shelves or such that might be suitable? The floorboards are made up of 1.5in by 2in strips as you would find in a Thames punt.
I don't have to repeat the rant about the cost, unsustainability and general rubbishness of timber merchants' so-called mahogany in this forum, I know. My usual source, the amazing Inksters, is out of recycled mahog.


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LASER41420 LASER41420
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Re: Matching mahogany

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Hi,
I might be able to help, there are some planks cut from old laboratory benching in my garage
in TW15 1AQ. It looks like mahogany and is definitely recycled.
Steve
inwe inwe
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Re: Matching mahogany

Hi Chris
Like wise I have stacks of laboratory bench tops but non were mahogany, mostly they are either teak or iroko, there might be occasional afromosia but no mahogany.

Richard
Alan Alan
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Re: Matching mahogany

That makes three of us with secret stashes of lab bench tops! I also have some bits of workbench in mahogany, 113" x 14.5" x 1.75".
I am in Bromley, SE London/NW Kent.
Chris Partridge Chris Partridge
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Re: Matching mahogany

A few more details of the project. I need to make six more of these:


The slats are 1 1/4 in by 3/4 thick, and the laths underneath are 1 1/4 by 1/2 in.
This floorboard is one of the widest at just under 3ft, so I will need roughly 70ft of the 3/4 in and about 18ft of the 1/2 in.
If anyone has got enough to make that lot I will accept with gratitude!
If not, it is off to Covers to get a bunch of Douglas Fir to make a complete new set - the old floorboard will be hung on the wall as a memorial to a bygone age when you could get the wood.
LASER41420 LASER41420
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Re: Matching mahogany

Hi Chris,
Sounds like the teak? laboratory benching is ideal, and between us there is plenty of it. Mine is 1 inch thick and sawn in to planks about 8 by 1 foot. Sounds like you need to make one of us an offer. I am building my row canoe so open to anything boat-building or rowing related.
Steve
inwe inwe
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Re: Matching mahogany

Don't go to a diy store I agree with previous statement we can provide enough teak for goodness sake.
I'll need to go down to my lock up to see exactly how much I have down there but should be enough for at least half if not more. I don't need much more for the Yawl then what's left is up for grabs.
Jeremy Jeremy
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Re: Matching mahogany

In reply to this post by LASER41420
I've got some lab bench that got split down the middle.  It's either teak or iroko, and about 1 1/8" thick.

The lengths are 53", and one bit is 13" wide, the other 11" wide.  Like most of these lab benches it's made from lengths of timber that are glued together with joints that are a bit like biscuit joints, so there will be some unusable bits.  There are also three holes at one end where a vice was bolted on.

Theoretically, you could get around 16 to 18 bits 1 1/4" wide and around 1" thick from this, around 53" long.  

It's free if you want it, as I don't have any use for it and it's just sitting in my car port as a "may come in handy".
Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Matching mahogany

I've never engraved a builder's plate for MilliBee.

So can I blag a hardwood offcut sometime please - about 6x4 or bigger. Maybe two larger pieces to engrave her name either side of the bow.

Here is our Tutorial on sign engraving (I've developed ArtCAM for years and years)
http://www.artcam.com/videos-and-tutorials/insignia/2012/creating-an-engraved-sign.asp

thanks
Paul
Say NO to Brexit. Kick it into the long grass
Chris Partridge Chris Partridge
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Re: Matching mahogany

Many thanks for all the offers. I have got a bit distracted by a) rowing and b) getting the boat ready for varnishing.
So now I need recommendations for the best varnish. It needs to cover both mahogany and oak. Or should I use oil?
What do you true craftsmen use?
inwe inwe
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Re: Matching mahogany

I have taken to ravelak by Jotun. But you have a wide choice out there. Do you want a two pot or one?

Richard
Timmo Timmo
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Re: Matching mahogany

While varnish may be the best finish for the hull (and any decking) I've a preference personally for an oil finish on floorboards. Varnish suffers from gritty shoes scuffing it up so it quickly loses it's shine and it's then a serious cleaning, sanding and revarnishing job. 

An oil finish, on the other hand, is less shiny in the first place so is both less slippy and more forgiving when scuffed about. It can also be easily topped up. 

Downside is that you do have to top up an oil finish quite regularly, but the wood looks lovely when you do. 

I've tried oils from a wide price range from those sold for marine use to cheap deckink oil and am confident that decking oil is both good value and effective. Currently using Ronseal but I'm not sure there's a lot of difference between it and some B&Q branded product I've used in the past.

Tim




On 27 Dec 2014, at 23:48, inwe [via UK HBBR Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:

I have taken to ravelak by Jotun. But you have a wide choice out there. Do you want a two pot or one?

Richard


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Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Matching mahogany

So oil sounds ideal for MilliBee's painted in outwales that have taken quite a bashing over the years. The paint is flaking off also.

Does oil work with softwood?

Paul
Say NO to Brexit. Kick it into the long grass
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Re: Matching mahogany

Varnishing is a life sentence.
I have told others, if they ever see me with a tin again, stick my head in it.
Chris, for your lovely little boat, I would suggest painting the hull, up to the rubbing strip, with good quality paint, and oiling the gunwales etc.
Inside, I'd also consider paint for the hull, and oil for the floor boards, thwarts, stretcher etc.
I can vouch for Timmo's decking oil. Or you could try Deks Olje or similar.
Oil has to be re-done quite often but you just give it a wipe over with an oily cloth every now and again which is quite theraputic.  

If you simply have to varnish go for a traditional type like Le Tonkinoise which is a delight to use.
Cheers, Grum.

Timmo Timmo
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Re: Matching mahogany

In reply to this post by Paul (admin)
Most garden decking is softwood so the answer is yes, oil does work with softwood. You could argue that decking is also protected by pressure treatments. The counter view would be that boats like Millibee are dry sailed, so timbers aren't subject to constant exposure to the weather. 

So long as the oil finish is regularly topped up (just a wipe with an oil soaked rag every few weeks) it works really well. Because it soaks in rather than forming a watertight skin it doesn't suffer from being scraped off, makes it ideal for rubbing strakes. Worth thinning the first coat or two with white spirit or turps to aid penetration. If the weather is cold  you might also warm the oil before applying it.

As I understand it oil doesn't actually completely prevent water penetrating the wood, is simply occupies spaces in the cellular structure that water would otherwise enter thereby slowing down the absorbtion of water. This means it also allows water to evaporate out again (unlike epoxy or varnish that seals water in forcing it to either lift off the finish or stay in the wood and potentially start rot.)

Here endeth the broadcast in favour of oil.

It also has to be said that when varnish is done well (some will know the quality of finish Chris Perkins has achieved on his boats) it is a thing of true beauty!

Tim.



On 28 Dec 2014, at 16:39, Paul (admin) [via UK HBBR Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:

So oil sounds ideal for MilliBee's painted in outwales that have taken quite a bashing over the years. The paint is flaking off also.

Does oil work with softwood?

Paul
Sail when you can, motor when you can't http://www.millibee.com



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