Pam gets a new roller blind.

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Randonneur Randonneur
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Pam gets a new roller blind.

Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Pam gets a new roller blind.

Pete,

That's an excellent "build". Nice and simple and it stows away neatly.

Be honest - you must have had a motor boat behind you with one of these on the foredeck:



Otherwise, where is this mythical river with a tail wind?


-Paul
Port-Na-Storm Port-Na-Storm
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Re: Pam gets a new roller blind.

In reply to this post by Randonneur
Brilliant Pete!
Suits her to a tee, might steal the bathroom blind when she's not looking and have a go for Katie.
Just packing for Cobnor, weather looking a bit breezy 😡

Cheers. Graham.
LASER41420 LASER41420
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Re: Pam gets a new roller blind.

In reply to this post by Randonneur
Hi,
Any chance of a few pictures of the rolling system plus dimensions? I am thinking of making a small sailing rig for the row/canoe.
Thanks in advance.
Steve
Randonneur Randonneur
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Re: Pam gets a new roller blind.

LASER41420 wrote
Hi,
Any chance of a few pictures of the rolling system plus dimensions? I am thinking of making a small sailing rig for the row/canoe.
Thanks in advance.
Steve
OK, better late than never.
Firstly the sail. This was scaled down from a Paradox rig (dimensions approx).
The size is really up to the individual usage. Mark 3 version will be bigger, increasing luff length (and obviously a longer mast!).

Sail

The business end.
The rotating goose neck is made from a redundant dinghy chain plate. This is cut to length, an appropriate hole drilled for a 8mm stainless bolt. The boom is drilled out to the appropriate dimension, lined with epoxy and, once set, tapped with the appropriate tap to accommodate the 8mm bolt. There are a couple of SS washers between the chain plate and boom end to keep things smooth
In mark 1 version I used an uphaul to balance the downhaul force (otherwise the boom won't roll) but found it ineffective and reverted to Matt's original idea of having a proper "strut".
This is the black plastic conduit. This is splayed at the end and bolted through to the gooseneck fitting.
A rope is passed through which is tied down at a convenient place at deck level forming the universal joint.
Two pieces of ply create the roller drum cheeks to hold the downhaul line. The pictures should be self explanatory. In Mark3 these will be increased in size as the cheeks are not really high enough and occasionally the downhaul line will "ride" over the ends. (They were cut using the largest hole saw  I had to hand). You also need a fairlead, attached to the strut, near the drum takeoff point.

Hopefully that's all self explanatory.
To operate either pull on the halyard or the down haul, depending on which way you want the roller to move
Simple.
20150110_135944

20150110_135959

20150110_140032
(Backdrop courtesy of Recycling Box).

Heavy duty Paradox version:
PICT0132

A couple of videos of the furler in action onboard Enigma.






HTH
PP
Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Pam gets a new roller blind.

Would the roller blind sail work on a stayed mast?

I "crewed" with Al once and liked the simplicity of the sail; I've often wondered if it would work with MilliBee. With her new centreboard at a generous 20in wide by 36in at the tip plus a skeg there will be plenty of grip in the water.

-Paul
Randonneur Randonneur
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Re: Pam gets a new roller blind.


On Sun, Jan 11, 2015 at 11:48 AM, Paul (admin) [via UK HBBR Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:
Would the roller blind sail work on a stayed mast?


Yes but - 
It would have to be mast head rigged without spreaders or lower shrouds.

If not, then it won't work.
Removing spreaders and lower shrouds wouldn't be an option as you'll end up with a wet noodle rather than a mast.

Unstayed is so much cleaner :-)

PP
 


 
alopenboat alopenboat
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Re: Pam gets a new roller blind.



On 11 Jan 2015 at 5:35, Randonneur [via UK HBBR Forum] wrote:

>
>
> On Sun, Jan 11, 2015 at 11:48 AM, Paul (admin) [via UK HBBR Forum] <
> [hidden email]> wrote:
>
> > Would the roller blind sail work on a stayed mast?
> >
>
>
> Yes but -
> It would have to be mast head rigged without spreaders or lower
> shrouds.
>
> If not, then it won't work.
> Removing spreaders and lower shrouds wouldn't be an option as you'll
> end up with a wet noodle rather than a mast.
>
> Unstayed is so much cleaner :-)
>

You wouldn't necessarily have to cut a hole in your cabin roof. An
unstayed mast can be deck mounted. Matt Layden did it with Little
Cruiser where he used short struts to support the mast. Sort of like
a very broad-based tabernacle.

--
Sail when you can, row when you must, motor
when you have to be at work in the morning.

Alastair Law
Yeovil, England.
<http://www.little.jim.freeuk.com>


Chris Waite Chris Waite
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Re: Pam gets a new roller blind.

Paulie

This is just a lug rig with a cleverly rotary sort of boom.  The rig would need to be stayed from the mast head to keep the length of the mast itself clear - yes; and unless both spars are parallel you cannot furl it entirely on the 'rolly-ma-pull-you' system.

Further the 'throat', at the lower forward end of the yard, would need to be able to swing inside the forestay.  That's the difficult bit as you cannot have it horizontal to roll and angled with a high-peak (low-throat) to miss the forestay, all at once.  High peaked makes for a much narrower and therefore better aspect for windward work.  People will say that you could have a shorter spar, but that means you need a taller mast, or you will have a smaller sail area.  A gaff rig with the yard behind the mast, but two halyards and twice the string, is another way of overcoming this.

Check out the single halyard on the Norfolk Wherry gaff which is very cleverly rove to avoid this.... but has enough string to hang a legion and also, I suspect relies on the weight of a huge canvas sail and the large part of a tree to support it.  I've thought about it, but never seen it done on a dinghy.  Even the simplest topping lift, as on 'Polly Wee' does not reliably lift evenly to get the boom above my head for rowing.  One end invariably rises before the other, though once it is hauled 'chock-a-block' it does end up horizontal.

The Great Sod controls the swings and roundabouts aloft as well

CW  
Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Pam gets a new roller blind.

Chris Waite wrote
Paulie

This is just a lug rig with a cleverly rotary sort of boom.  The rig would need to be stayed from the mast head to keep the length of the mast itself clear - yes; and unless both spars are parallel you cannot furl it entirely on the 'rolly-ma-pull-you' system.
.........
 I've thought about it, but never seen it done on a dinghy.
.......
Ah, so that boils down to Gunter or Gaff then for me?

-Paul
alopenboat alopenboat
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Re: Pam gets a new roller blind.

On 12 Jan 2015 at 14:10, Paul (admin) [via UK HBBR Forum] wrote:

>
>
> Chris Waite wrote
> > Paulie
> >
> > This is just a lug rig with a cleverly rotary sort of boom.  The rig
> > would need to be stayed from the mast head to keep the length of the
> > mast itself clear - yes; and unless both spars are parallel you
> > cannot furl it entirely on the 'rolly-ma-pull-you' system. .........
> >  I've thought about it, but never seen it done on a dinghy.
> > .......
>
> Ah, so that boils down to Gunter or Gaff then for me?

The Paradox addresses some of the furling problem by having a tapered
boom, thinner at the forward end.

--
Sail when you can, row when you must, motor
when you have to be at work in the morning.

Alastair Law
Yeovil, England.
<http://www.little.jim.freeuk.com>