Tales of Illusion

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Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Tales of Illusion

The latest work on Illusion is to add the internal tiller steering, just like Matt Layden's Paradox, Enigna and Elusion designs.

The concept is to permanently mount the tiller through a hole in the transom and run a loop of rope around the cockpit that ties off on the tiller. So by pulling the loop clockwise or anti-clockwise you can steer the rudder remotely anywhere in the cockpit. For sharpie designs that have a narrow beam this is a great feature as the skipper can face forwards all the time - in Matt's designs to balance heeling the skipper simply slides left or right on a thwart seat and the rudder is trimmed via the steering rope.

Here is the work in prototype form. The deck eyes will be replaced by blocks when they arrive and the steering rope will pass through holes in the bulkhead:



Here is the outside view. Cutting the slot involved a bit of trial and error, erring on the cautious side on the first cut. Then I widened the slot to get an even swing of the tiller port and starboard. The hinges are stainless, strong enough for 60kg doors, fire-rated and less than £10 at Screwfix:




The eagled eyed viewers will have noticed the bloody great big hole in the rear bulkhead. This opens up the rear compartment for a permanent cooking stove and other storage. The hole is above the waterline and its height was chosen scientifically just above the boot marks left after rowing her:



I really like this improvement and she feels more like a micro-cruiser now. I think there will be enough ventilation to use the stove in-place ...... bacon and eggs in the morning mmm.

I know she still looks rough which is deliberate at the moment. Its an experimental design and when I'm happy with the final design she will get tarted up and painted.

-Paul
Say NO to Brexit. Kick it into the long grass
tony waller tony waller
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RE: Tales of Illusion

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Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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RE: Tales of Illusion

Tony,

I hope she will be on the Thames Raid also! - there will be plenty to chat about.



When you get time can you log onto the forum and edit your message? (click More | Edit Post) Then trim it down to just your reply....because my post and all the pictures got duplicated when you hit "Reply" on your email program. Now and again its no problem on small posts, but if a big post gets duplicated the topic becomes difficult to follow.

At the moment admins cannot edit messages - hopefully Nabble will add that feature.

cheers
Paul
Say NO to Brexit. Kick it into the long grass
alopenboat alopenboat
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Re: Tales of Illusion

In reply to this post by Paul (admin)
On 27 Mar 2011 at 16:06, adminHBBR [via UK HBBR Forum] wrote:

> ..... in Matt's designs to balance heeling the
> skipper simply slides left or right on a thwart seat and the rudder is
> trimmed via the steering rope.

In practice, in Little Jim, the boat does all the balancing. I tend
to lounge in the downhill corner as that is much easier than holding
myself up to the windward side. The change in righting moment in
moving from one side of the seat to the other is very small in any
case.

Just come back from a very nice gentle sail across to Cowes and back
after the DCA AGM.

--
Hoping for calm nights

Alastair Law,      
Yeovil, England.
<http://www.little.jim.freeuk.com>          

cornishhh cornishhh
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RE: Tales of Illusion

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Hi Paul,
Good to see your boat coming along.
I've installed my steering system;unfortunately I don't have a camera,so I'll describe what I've done.
I've not used pulleys.Instead I've used dumb sheaves in the aft compartment-actually a wooden drawer knob cut in half with each piece fixed to the back of the bulkhead.
The tiller lines bear on these,pass through holes in the bulkhead,along the sides of the cabin,and into short lengths of garden hose which are gently radiused and glassed to the cabin side and forward bulkhead.
I hope this makes sense!
Pulleys maybe better,but what I've used is simple and cheap.
The line runs very freely.
I hadn't thought of using door hinges for the rudder.
I've used galvanised hinges intended for a lift off gate.
They would probobly be overkill on a 20 footer!
Cheers
Neil


Neil Barratt, Cornwall, UK email :- [hidden email]


 

Date: Sun, 27 Mar 2011 16:06:28 -0700
From: [hidden email]
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Tales of Illusion

The latest work on Illusion is to add the internal tiller steering, just like Matt Layden's Paradox, Enigna and Elusion designs.

The concept is to permanently mount the tiller through a hole in the transom and run a loop of rope around the cockpit that ties off on the tiller. So by pulling the loop clockwise or anti-clockwise you can steer the rudder remotely anywhere in the cockpit. For sharpie designs that have a narrow beam this is a great feature as the skipper can face forwards all the time - in Matt's designs to balance heeling the skipper simply slides left or right on a thwart seat and the rudder is trimmed via the steering rope.

Here is the work in prototype form. The deck eyes will be replaced by blocks when they arrive and the steering rope will pass through holes in the bulkhead:



Here is the outside view. Cutting the slot involved a bit of trial and error, erring on the cautious side on the first cut. Then I widened the slot to get an even swing of the tiller port and starboard. The hinges are stainless, strong enough for 60kg doors, fire-rated and less than £10 at Screwfix:




The eagled eyed viewers will have noticed the bloody great big hole in the rear bulkhead. This opens up the rear compartment for a permanent cooking stove and other storage. The hole is above the waterline and its height was chosen scientifically just above the boot marks left after rowing her:



I really like this improvement and she feels more like a micro-cruiser now. I think there will be enough ventilation to use the stove in-place ...... bacon and eggs in the morning mmm.


-Paul


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Jeremy Jeremy
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Re: Tales of Illusion

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I'm really impressed by the level of civilised living being squeezed into such a small space.  Years ago I remember struggling with the decision as to whether or not to fit a single or double burner stove in a 1 ton+ 20ft LOD gaff cutter due to (what I thought at the time) was a lack of space...........

I like the idea of being enveloped by the hull; I'm guessing part of the original inspiration must have been the idea that you don't need seats to sit on in a boat, sitting on the bottom of the hull is fine.  Seeing pictures of similar micro cruisers sailing does remind me of the large model boat builders though.  There are one or two locally that have built replica warships - they lift the superstructure up and sit inside them to motor them around the boating pond.

Jeremy
Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Tales of Illusion

Jeremy wrote
I'm really impressed by the level of civilised living being squeezed into such a small space.  Years ago I remember struggling with the decision as to whether or not to fit a single or double burner stove in a 1 ton+ 20ft LOD gaff cutter due to (what I thought at the time) was a lack of space...........

I like the idea of being enveloped by the hull; I'm guessing part of the original inspiration must have been the idea that you don't need seats to sit on in a boat, sitting on the bottom of the hull is fine.  
Thanks Jeremy,

There is an "aircraft cockpit" feel to sailing her, which I'm sure you will appreciate, due to the enclosed hull and deck. The front compartment will have a sealed door and store heavy items like tinned food, water and a 17Ah battery to run a smart phone, interior lights, VHF and a mast light. There is room on the deck for one or two solar panels to charge the battery.

The smart phone (probs HTC Wildfire) will be on the right, always accessible and protected under the decking. Naturally it becomes the "glass cockpit" for GPS, compass/pitch/roll (via Android sensors) and maps* - the VHF will be on the left.

Because the decking covers half the 6ft cabin there is space forward to hang a bag of clothes and sleeping bag, kept dry off the floor.

I'm not sure about the cabin yet - probably polycarbonate sides and front with a canvas top at night.

-Paul
Say NO to Brexit. Kick it into the long grass
Randonneur Randonneur
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Re: Tales of Illusion

adminHBBR wrote
I'm not sure about the cabin yet - probably polycarbonate sides and front with a canvas top at night.

-Paul
Paul you might be interested in what Terry has done with his Enigma clone "Shore Leave" http://linkgen.net/shoreleave/
He started of with a semi hard top but removed it because of  the Florida heat (a problem we don't experience often!).

I expect some pictures of his soft top version will be posted shortly.

Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Tales of Illusion

Randonneur wrote
Paul you might be interested in what Terry has done with his Enigma clone "Shore Leave" http://linkgen.net/shoreleave/
He started of with a semi hard top but removed it because of  the Florida heat (a problem we don't experience often!).

I expect some pictures of his soft top version will be posted shortly.
With the Thames Raid round the corner I want to build a cabin in the simplest, quickest way. Maybe detachable so it can be improved after trials.
Can anybody suggest how to build a cabin in one day!?

-Paul
Say NO to Brexit. Kick it into the long grass
LASER41420 LASER41420
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Re: Tales of Illusion

jeffbobdean jeffbobdean
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RE: Pop-up "cabin"

If its anything like my pop up tent don’t even think about it.  It’s a battle of will to un-pop it in a field – goodness knows what it’d be like on a boat – I suspect crew or tent would end up overboard.

 

Dean

 

From: LASER41420 [via UK HBBR Forum] [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: 30 March 2011 20:45
To: deansephton
Subject: Re: Tales of Illusion

 

How about a pop up cabin?
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/DOME-CAMPING-FESTIVAL-HIKING-2-MAN-POP-UP-TENT-NEW-/400205758339?pt=UK_SportsLeisure_HikingCamping_Tents_JN&hash=item5d2e1f3f83
Steve


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LASER41420 LASER41420
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RE: Pop-up "cabin"

To observe such a battle at the end of each day would make the raid a lot more entertaining though!

Steve

--- On Wed, 30/3/11, deansephton [via UK HBBR Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:


From: deansephton [via UK HBBR Forum] <[hidden email]>
Subject: RE: Pop-up "cabin"
To: "LASER41420" <[hidden email]>
Date: Wednesday, 30 March, 2011, 21:00

If its anything like my pop up tent don’t even think about it.  It’s a battle of will to un-pop it in a field – goodness knows what it’d be like on a boat – I suspect crew or tent would end up overboard.

 

Dean

 

From: LASER41420 [via UK HBBR Forum] [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: 30 March 2011 20:45
To: deansephton
Subject: Re: Tales of Illusion

 

How about a pop up cabin?
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/DOME-CAMPING-FESTIVAL-HIKING-2-MAN-POP-UP-TENT-NEW-/400205758339?pt=UK_SportsLeisure_HikingCamping_Tents_JN&hash=item5d2e1f3f83
Steve


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Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Tales of Illusion

In reply to this post by LASER41420
Lol - Steve that's not a bad idea really - there would be plenty of space.


Meanwhile here is a quick mock-up. 2x1 cleats from rear bulkhead to deck beam forming a strong quadrilateral upon which a cabin can be built. With narrow side decks the gunwales will be much stronger.





Chris Waite has kindly produced a drop-dead gorgeous cabin sketch inspired by modern car lines. She would certainly turn heads:





The concept is polycarbonate front and sides with a canvas roof. Its a brilliant design..not sure how to build it though...or whether there is enough space....

-Paul
Say NO to Brexit. Kick it into the long grass
Randonneur Randonneur
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Re: Tales of Illusion

Matt used a soft dodger on Enigma (as well as Swamp Thing and Sand Flea) not unlike Chris's sketch.
It consists of just 2 aluminium hoops which can be folded flat or remove entirely.










Sand Flea has a very simple dodger held up with fibre glass rods.



Timmo Timmo
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Re: Tales of Illusion

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Chris's sketch looks good. Couple of laminated wood beams could be knocked up very quickly to suit whatever curve you want for the roof. 

Tim.


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Re: Tales of Illusion

In reply to this post by Paul (admin)
You could use the fibreglass and bungee collapsible tent rods  with the ends anchored around the cockpit area, that way you could have something that would pack down into quite a small bag during the day!

--- On Wed, 30/3/11, adminHBBR [via UK HBBR Forum] <[hidden email]> wrote:

From: adminHBBR [via UK HBBR Forum] <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: Tales of Illusion
To: "LASER41420" <[hidden email]>
Date: Wednesday, 30 March, 2011, 22:08

Lol - Steve that's not a bad idea really - there would be plenty of space.


Meanwhile here is a quick mock-up. 2x1 cleats from rear bulkhead to deck beam forming a strong quadrilateral upon which a cabin can be built. With side decks the gunwales will be much stronger.





Chris Waite has kindly produced a drop-dead gorgeous cabin sketch inspired by modern car lines. She would certainly turn heads:





The concept is polycarbonate front and sides with a canvas roof. Its a brilliant design..not sure how to build it though...or whether there is enough space....

-Paul
-Paul


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Jeremy Jeremy
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Re: Tales of Illusion

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I think you could fairly easily make that neat design that Chris has sketched by using two alloy tube hoops and some thin polycarbonate sheet.  I've used 1.5mm sheet for aircraft windscreens, but I think that opting for 2mm sheet would be better for this design.  If it were smoke tinted it might also be less like a greenhouse.

Alloy tubing of around 16g wall and maybe 1/2" or 5/8" diameter should be OK and will fairly easily adopt a fair curve with no bending (the stringers on the Aerowherry are 1/2" x 16g).  The thin polycarbonate sheet can be cut neatly with tin snips and just pop riveted to the tubes, using big head rivets (black anodised ones would look neater).  The outer seams at the forward end can be arranged so that the side and front sheets of polycarbonate touch, with the space between them sealed with a bead of Sikaflex before the forward sheet is fitted, then the joint could be just filed smooth and maybe edge polished, after the Sikaflex has cured.

The canvas part at the aft end could be made like a 2CV roof, with either alloy tubes or fibreglass rods sewn in crosswise to give stiffness.  I think this could be fastened by simply using velcro around the edges.  If the canvas overlaps the polycarbonate by an inch or so it should seal up pretty well, although it would be best if the top edge of the forward windscreen was lower than the highest point on the hoops, so that water would naturally want to run off.

It'd definitely look sleek!

Jeremy
Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Tales of Illusion

Thanks all for the suggestions and Jeremy's advice about using alloy tubes and cutting polycarbonate.

We (my seamstress and myself) are leaning towards the tent principle because it is easy to modify and familiar to us. Dilys suggested a trial sewn out of cotton to get the shape of the panels correct, then the real thing made using PVC coated canvas from Point North, who also sell clear PVC for the windows as well as zips etc.

cheers
Paul

 
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Paul (admin) Paul (admin)
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Re: Tales of Illusion

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Smartphones are amazing - it only took 2 clicks to take and upload this video of Illusion's cabin mock up a few minutes ago. The side panel is cut oversize but I hope you can see the curve in the front and side panels...similar to Chris's design somewhat.
I tried all combinations and whilst I prefer the C-Dubs style it is not practical because of lack of headroom. So I have gone with Matt's design but as curvy as possible - there is plenty of room inside. The aft end will be angled, its left uncut until the frame is built:



What do you all think? Will she turn heads? Do the lines follow the hull naturally? Could it be improved within the compromises?

cheers
Paul
Say NO to Brexit. Kick it into the long grass
cornishhh cornishhh
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Re: Tales of Illusion

Cabin looks pretty good to me-Matt's original is similar,as you say.
Are you having an open rear,or a step in hatch like the original.
Whatever shape of cabin you put on the boat she will turn heads!
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