Tirrik for a novice?

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bigdave bigdave
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Tirrik for a novice?

After a lot of searching for the right boat to build I have come down to the Tirrik I am looking to build next spring summer giving me time to read and research in the mean time.

So can a novice build one? I have fitted a grp hull out before and I have basic woodworking skills I don't want a long build ideally the boat will be finished by the end of summer or at least the bulk of construction done.

Any advice welcome

Dave
Port-Na-Storm Port-Na-Storm
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Re: Tirrik for a novice?

Hi Dave,
I built the Whilly Tern, smaller sister to the Tirrik as my first proper build after a stitch & tape canoe.
I think its a good choice for a novice. Iain Oughtred’s plans are excellent, with all the information you need clearly laid out, I’d compliment this with a copy of his book,
 Clinker Pywood Boatbuilding Manual

Being a double-ender means not having to worry about the sometimes tricky work of fitting a transom, and the sweeping curves of the stems and planks reduces the amount of bending needed to fit the planks.
The balanced lug option will be much easier to build than the gunter rig.

I prefer to make the ancillary bits and pieces like the Spars, Rudder, Tiller, Centreboard etc. first as its easier to do this when you haven't got a great big hull sitting in your workshop, it also means you see some progress early on, and the completion stage once the hull is turned over is quicker, which helps to reduce my impatience.
In the normal scheme of things once the hull is turned you are about one third of the way through the build, fitting out takes a long time. Don't set yourself unrealistic time-scales, relax and enjoy the process.
I would seriously consider getting Alec Jordan at Jordan Boats to cut you a set of planks and moulds. This will reduce your build time enormously. The additional cost can be off-set against the reduction in waste and time.
Why wait? Buy the plans and book and get going before the winter sets in, and keep us posted on progress.
Good Luck,
Graham

   
bigdave bigdave
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Re: Tirrik for a novice?

Thanks I have sent for the book and had already decided to get the kit from Jordan boats, I was looking to build in a gazebo but after a conversation last night I may be able to use a large outbuilding so I have my fingers crossed there.

I have been trying to find out what other timber I'll need so I can cost it but had no joy yet I have tried joining a Yahoo group but had no joy from there.

Dave
Port-Na-Storm Port-Na-Storm
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Re: Tirrik for a novice?

Now Dave,
You are new here so there are a few things you need to get straight.
We don't often talk about price around here. There are some things that can't really be talked about in public. My wife sometimes reads the posts and she really doesn't need to know.
But seeing as you are new here's a few pointers.  
The cost of timber varies enormously depending if you buy sawn or PAR, i.e. planed all round.
The latter tends to be much more expensive and you will only end up shaving most of it off anyway.
The bigger the lump of wood you can deal with and machine yourself the cheaper it will be in the long run.
For the Tirrik you'll need enough for the backbone, i.e. keelson keel and stems. Then the inner and outer gunwale, then the thwarts. The main thing will be the spars, which will require clear, i.e. no knots straight grained stuff. I tend to use Douglas Fir as spruce is just too expensive. Find yourself a good timber supplier or saw mill and go and talk to them with a cutting list. You can pretty much work that out from the plans.  Think a few hundred quid.
Your biggest expenditure comes in big lumps towards the end of the build. Paint can come as a bit of a surprise, chandlery can mount up especially if you go for bronze, a nice traditional looking lugsail could stretch to £500 and then you'll need a trailer. I don't want to put you off but stretching out the build schedule can sometimes help the cash-flow.
Whatever you do don't add it all up at the end.
As Iain would say Have Fun!
inwe inwe
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Re: Tirrik for a novice?

In reply to this post by bigdave
Hi Dave, I can only reiterate what Graham has said, but don't scrimp on materials. Having both marked out my own planks and bought a set from Alec, I know which I now prefer. Just returned from 'the barn' and my new build, just enjoy it and don't treat it so seriously that it becomes a chore! I'm on spars at the moment all six and I wish I'd done some earlier. Oh having given myself a very bad 'throat' get yourself a good dust mask P2 grade. I've just spent £1000 on a new trailer, beware of the new EU regs on trailers. I have made a lot in my time but have now stopped as I would have to get type approval. Not worth it anymore. As for wood it depends where you are.
Graham mentioned paint, I have used Jotun on the Yawl, so far quite satisfied but their primer is pungent!
The building frame - look for a demolition site they can't take the wood to the waste tip so they burn it of give it away.

Happy Building